Academic coaching research

On this page we regularly list current research publications. Some of them are openly accessible.
 

Become the best coach you can be: the role of coach training and coaching experience in workplace coaching quality and quality control

Authors & title

Diller, S.J., Passmore, J., Brown, H.J. et al. Become the best coach you can be: the role of coach training and coaching experience in workplace coaching quality and quality control. Organisationsberat Superv Coach 27, 313–333 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11613-020-00662-8

 

Abstracts

This paper explores whether coach training or coaching experience leads to better coaching quality and quality control. In two large studies, both coaches (N1 = 2267) and personnel managers who book coaches for their company (N2 = 754) answered questions about coaching quality and quality control. The results show that more coach training leads to not only a better self-perceived coaching quality (Study 1) but also a better other-perceived coaching-quality (Study 2); moreover, more coach training positively affects quality control. It is remarkable that coaching experience showed no significant relation regarding other-perceived coaching quality and quality control. Study 2 further revealed that references lead to more recommendations but not to a better coaching quality or quality control. Thus, coach training is an essential factor when selecting organizational coaches. Further research is needed to understand the impact of different approaches to coach trainings on coaching outcomes.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11613-020-00662-8


Initial exploration in workplace coaching – Coaches' thematic and methodological approach.

Authors & title
Diermann, I., Kotte, S., Müller, A., & Möller, H. (2021). Initial exploration in workplace coaching – Coaches' thematic and methodological approach. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice (RCOA) DOI: 10.1080/17521882.2021.1879188

 

Abstract
Coaching is increasingly used as an HRD intervention. Initial research suggests the importance of coaching behaviour, especially at the beginning of a coaching engagement, for coaching success. However, findings are scarce as to how coaches proceed during the initial phase in coaching and recent reviews therefore call for research that investigates how coaches determine the focus of the coaching intervention. Therefore, our study aimed to answer the questions of what and how regarding coaches’ approach to the ‘initial exploration’. We conducted 20 semi-structured interviews with workplace coaches. Qualitative content analysis revealed a broad range of contents addressed, methods applied, and principles that guide coaches during the initial exploration. Moreover, we identified specific patterns for categorising coaches’ approaches. Concerning the content coaches address, we identified three dimensions: coachees’ areas of life (private vs. professional, with the latter including individual vs. social vs. organisational aspects), temporal focus (past, present, future), and perspective (solution- vs. problem-orientation). We integrate our findings into a taxonomy of the initial exploration in coaching and thereby provide a basis for future research as well as a guide for reflection and decision-making for coaches, coachees, and organisational sponsors.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17521882.2021.1879188


Entrepreneurial Coaching: A Two-Dimensional Framework in Context. Applied Psychology – An International Review

 

Authors & title
Kotte, S.*, Diermann, I.*, Rosing, K. & Möller, H. (2020). Entrepreneurial Coaching: A Two-Dimensional Framework in Context. Applied Psychology – An International Review, 1–38. DOI: 10.1111/apps.12264.

 

Abstract
Coaching is increasingly used to support entrepreneurs across different stages of the entrepreneurial process. Due to its custom‐tailored, active, and reflection‐oriented approach, it has been suggested that it is particularly well suited to entrepreneurs’ complex job demands. However, in the entrepreneurial context, the term coaching lacks a clear definition and is frequently used interchangeably with other types of support. We therefore sought to characterize entrepreneurial coaching (EC) and to position it relative to related interventions. We conducted 67 interviews with coaches (n = 44) and early‐stage entrepreneurs (n = 23) experienced in EC. Using qualitative content analysis, we specify outcomes, input, process, and contextual factors for EC. Among process factors, we identify seven coach functions that reflect specific coach behaviors. Contextual factors include entrepreneurial job demands and institutional boundary conditions of “embedded” EC. Based on our findings, we position EC within a two‐dimensional framework, consisting of the expert‐ versus process‐consultation approach and the individual‐work‐venture focus. We locate the seven coach functions within this framework. Relative to other interventions, EC stands between classical workplace coaching and start‐up consultancy, closer to, yet distinct from, entrepreneurial mentoring and executive coaching. We derive practical implications for coaches, entrepreneurs, and organizational stakeholders and propose directions for future research.

https://doi.org/10.1111/apps.12264.


Of SMART, GROW and goals gone wild: A systematic literature review on the relevance of goal activities in workplace coaching.

Authors & title

Müller, A. A. & Kotte, S. (2020). Of SMART, GROW and goals gone wild: A systematic literature review on the relevance of goal activities in workplace coaching. International Coaching Psychology Review, 15(2), 69–98

 

Abstract
Goals are posited to play an important role in coaching. However, concerns have been raised about neglecting potential pitfalls of goal-focused coaching practice. Therefore, we investigate the occurrence of goal activities in workplace coaching and their association with coaching outcomes. We conducted a systematic literature review. We synthesised findings of 24 (quantitative and qualitative) empirical studies. Previously researched goal activities encompass goal setting, setting action/development plans and a goal-focused coach-coachee relationship. Coaches report to work with goals frequently, while coachees report this to occur less. Several studies suggest a positive relationship between goal activities and coaching outcomes, while other studies report no significant association. This lack of association seems to relate to both study design and chosen outcome measures. Initial findings point to possible moderating variables (e.g. coachee characteristics, initiator of goal activity) and potential challenges of involving organisational stakeholders in goal activities. The scarcity of empirical research stands in contrast to the prominent role of goals in the coaching literature. Goal activities take a wide range of different forms in practice and research. Inconclusive findings on the relationship between goal activities and coaching outcomes call for research on influencing factors, particularly contextual factors.

https://shop.bps.org.uk/international-coaching-psychology-review-vol-15-no-2-autumn-2020https://www.researchgate.net/publication/344353393_Of_SMART_GROW_and_goals_gone_
wild_A_systematic_literature_review_on_the_relevance_of_goal_activities_in_workplace_coaching


Coach and no regrets about it: On the life satisfaction, work-related mental strain, and use of supervision of workplace coaches.

Authors & title

Müller, A.A.; Kotte, S. & Möller, H. (2020) Coach and no regrets about it: On the life satisfaction, work-related mental strain, and use of supervision of workplace coaches. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 13:1, 16-29, DOI: 10.1080/17521882.2019.1636841.

 

Abstract

Previous research indicates that coaches frequently experience negative effects for themselves from their work and therefore live with potential stressors due to their work. This study examines whether or not workplace coaches are satisfied with their life. Data were gathered from 110 coaches (75% of which were self-employed) from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland via an online survey. Coaches were asked about different aspects of life satisfaction (concerning their job, financial situation, and leisure time) and work-related mental strain (i.e., cognitive and emotional strain). Compared to German population norm scores (including both employed and self-employed working individuals), coaches show higher satisfaction with their job and leisure time, and less work-related mental strain. Moreover, the vast majority of coaches would choose to be a workplace coach again in retrospect. Coaching supervision had a significant buffer effect on coaches’ job satisfaction when they experienced a high amount of work-related mental strain. Findings imply that coaches are able to counterbalance the possible negative effects on life satisfaction of their work as coaches. The use of coaching supervision appears to be a successful measure to maintain high satisfaction with their work as coaches despite an elevated level of mental strain.

https://doi.org/10.1080/17521882.2019.1636841


The Ambivalent Relationship Between Coaching Research and Coaching Practice: Discreetly Ignoring, Critically Observing or Beneficially Cooperating?

Authors & Title
Kotte, S.; Oellerich, K.; Hinn, D.E and Möller, H. (2017). The Ambivalent Relationship Between Coaching Research and Coaching Practice: Discreetly Ignoring, Critically Observing or Beneficially Cooperating? In: A. Schreyögg & C. Schmidt-Lellek: The Professionalization of Coaching. A Reader for the Coach, p. 23-46. Heidelberg: Springer.

 

Abstract
The article argues that it is necessary to take seriously the inherent logic of the two systems “research” and “practice” in the area of coaching in order to come to a realistic assessment of the ambivalent relationship between these two “worlds” and to identify concrete steps for moving towards a more sustainable working alliance between coaching practice and coaching research. For this purpose, we first elaborate on characteristics of both systems. In the main part, we provide an overview of the scientific publication landscape and of the current state of coaching research. We then deduce key challenges concerning the relationship between research and practice and conclude with an appeal to action for both researchers and practitioners.

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-16805-6_2

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